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Made In Hollywood Blog

Welcome to the Made In Hollywood Blog, where we share and discuss all things polystyrene from around the world, including cool point of sale implementations, innovative applications of polystyrene foam, and more. Subscribe to our RSS Feed.

September 7, 2009 – 5:20 pm

Formula 1 is go, go, dough.

- Posted in Extended Portfolio, Marketing related, Polystyrene Uses, Sport related by Fran

3D polystyrene F1 in Schools sign with Minister Batt O'Keefe

Minister Batt O'Keefe and Team Blink

The flag has dropped and we are into the start of a new school year, when kids across the country are encouraged to reach their potential and beyond, no matter what discipline they choose.
An example of this is F1 in Schools. This is a unique challenge that enables second-level students to get their hands on the latest technology from the worlds of engineering and manufacturing. The competition allows teams to design and manufacture compressed air-powered racing cars, to compete with other schools nationwide.
Minister for Education & Science, Batt O’Keeffe, was at the launch of the New 09-10 season last week. He spoke of stimulating and encouraging an interest in science, technology and engineering with pupils at secondary school level.
We employed quite a bit of technology and engineering ourselves to create the 3D sign used at the photo call. Using specialist software and computer-controlled (CNC) machines, we can produce a wide range of products suited to the engineering sector and other industries.

F1 car created by Michael Salter from styrofoam packaging

F1 car created by Michael Salter from styrofoam packaging

If, however, you are intent on building a racing car, it isn’t always necessary to have the latest technology and machinery. Sometimes all you need is a little imagination and a whole lot of  Styrofoam packaging.
Regular readers of this blog might already be familiar with the work of  Michael Salter. In the past he has created giant “Styrobots” from expanded polystyrene (EPS). He has now turned his talent into building this F1 car that is on display at South Waterfront in Portland, Oregon. Again, he uses the packing foam found around our household electrical and furniture items.

Ferrari logo on this F1 foam car

Ferrari logo on this F1 foam car

But to prove a point, here is an example of a Ferrari Formula 1 car we produced using the technology described above, and a small amount of foam. The outline of a Ferrari was traced and fed into the computer software which, in turn, controlled the hot-wire machine that cut the shape. The prancing horse and logo were glued onto the painted outline. This formula 1 look-a-like was destined for a bedroom wall and not a race track on the far side of the world.

You need a lot of dough for this F1 car

You need a lot of dough for this F1 car

If you were on the far side of the world, in the Royal Plaza Hotel, you might run into this: Asia’s first life-sized bread race car.
The culinary executive chef from the hotel led a team of 6 chefs, 2 artists, 2 technicians, 2 culinary staff and 5 young volunteers from Metta Welfare Association to create this race car model. The team took 549 hours to assemble the car and used a total of 15 kg of yeast, 14 litres of water, 2 kg of salt and 10800 ml of food varnish! The completed car is made up of 1,000 loaves and 22 varieties of bread, and not a sliced pan loaf to be seen anywhere. (via Klik.TV)

It seems quite obvious that someone must have misunderstood when they said it would take “a tonne of dough to make a racing car”; or should that be “bake a racing car”?